An examination of specified passages of the great gatsby by f scott fitzgerald

Our white girlhood was passed together there. Things went from bad to worse, until finally he had to give up his position. Miss Baker had mentioned him at dinner, and that would do for an introduction.

It seemed to me that the thing for Daisy to do was to rush out of the house, child in arms — but apparently there were no such intentions in her head. As I started my motor Daisy peremptorily called: Daisy took her face in her hands as if feeling its lovely shape, and her eyes moved gradually out into the velvet dusk.

I woke up out of the ether with an utterly abandoned feeling, and asked the nurse right away if it was a boy or a girl. Would you like to hear? Evidently it surprised her as much as it did me, for she yawned and with a series of rapid, deft movements stood up into the room.

She told me it was a girl, and so I turned my head away and wept. They were here, and they accepted Tom and me, making only a polite pleasant effort to entertain or to be entertained.

Gatsby himself, come out to determine what share was his of our local heavens. Tom and Miss Baker sat at either end of the long couch and she read aloud to him from the Saturday Evening Post.

Tom and Miss Baker, with several feet of twilight between them, strolled back into the library, as if to a vigil beside a perfectly tangible body, while, trying to look pleasantly interested and a little deaf, I followed Daisy around a chain of connecting verandas to the porch in front.

Their interest rather touched me and made them less remotely rich — nevertheless, I was confused and a little disgusted as I drove away. She sat down, glanced searchingly at Miss Baker and then at me, and continued: I waited, and sure enough, in a moment she looked at me with an absolute smirk on her lovely face, as if she had asserted her membership in a rather distinguished secret society to which she and Tom belonged.

They knew that presently dinner would be over and a little later the evening too would be over and casually put away. Slenderly, languidly, their hands set lightly on their hips, the two young women preceded us out onto a rosy-colored porch, open toward the sunset, where four candles flickered on the table in the diminished wind.

The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald

The lamp-light, bright on his boots and dull on the autumn-leaf yellow of her hair, glinted along the paper as she turned a page with a flutter of slender muscles in her arms. Then suddenly she threw her napkin on the table and excused herself and went into the house.

I decided to call to him. The murmur trembled on the verge of coherence, sank down, mounted excitedly, and then ceased altogether. Already it was deep summer on roadhouse roofs and in front of wayside garages, where new red gas-pumps sat out in pools of light, and when I reached my estate at West Egg I ran the car under its shed and sat for a while on an abandoned grass roller in the yard.

I am not even faintly like a rose. Involuntarily I glanced seaward — and distinguished nothing except a single green light, minute and far away, that might have been the end of a dock.

When we came in she held us silent for a moment with a lifted hand. As if his absence quickened something within her, Daisy leaned forward again, her voice glowing and singing. I think the home influence will be very good for her.The Great Gatsby, by F.

Scott Fitzgerald Chapter 1 In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I’ve been turning over in my mind ever since. The Great Gatsby F. Scott Fitzgerald • Chapter 1 • Chapter 2 • Chapter 3 • Chapter 4 • Chapter 5 • Chapter 6 • Chapter 7 • Chapter 8 • Chapter 9 Etext proofed by Roderick da Rat Under the Red, White, and Blue Then wear the gold hat, if that will move her.

Editions for The Great Gatsby: (Paperback published in ), (Kindle Edition published in ), (Kindle Edition published in ), (Audiobo. The Great Gatsby is a novel written by American author F. Scott Fitzgerald that follows a cast of characters living in the fictional town of West Egg on prosperous Long Island in the summer of Start studying The Great Gatsby Chapter 1 F.

Scott Fitzgerald.

Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. 1 Introduction to The Great Gatsby F.

Scott Fitzgerald's novel The Great Gatsby is a tragic love story, a mystery, and a social commentary on American life.

Although it was not a commercial success for.

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An examination of specified passages of the great gatsby by f scott fitzgerald
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